Acta Scientifica Malaysia (ASM)

OPTIMAL BMI CUT-OFF VALUES FOR PREDICTING DIABETES, HYPERTENSION AND HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA AMONG MALAYSIAN ADULTS’ POPULATION: REVISITING A DECADE OF OLD VALUES

July 8, 2021 Posted by din In asm

ABSTRACT

OPTIMAL BMI CUT-OFF VALUES FOR PREDICTING DIABETES, HYPERTENSION AND HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA AMONG MALAYSIAN ADULTS’ POPULATION: REVISITING A DECADE OF OLD VALUES

Journal: Acta Scientifica Malaysia (ASM)

Author: Azli Baharudin

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/asm.02.2021.80.84

Background: Body Mass Index (BMI) can be used to determine bodyweight categories. This study aimed to re-examine the previous optimal BMI cut-offs in identifying the Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) among the Malaysian adults’ population. Data were obtained from the National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS) 2019. Methods: It was a cross-sectional, population-based survey that employed a two-stage stratified random sampling design. A total of 10,472 adults aged 18 years and above participated in this survey throughout Malaysia, with the majority aged between 31 to 59 years. Results: The optimal BMI cut-off values for identifying diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and at least one NCD ranged from 22.92 to 24.81 kg/m2 for males. The highest optimal BMI cut-off value for at least one NCD in females was 26.29 kg/m2, while the lowest optimal BMI cut-off value was for hypercholesterolemia in females, which was 22.63 kg/m2. Our study has produced a more reliable and revised BMI cut-off point that can detect NCD at a lower BMI compared to available BMI classification. Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of recognizing the issue of BMI and obesity to tackle NCD. A new set of modified BMI which is very useful for tertiary care, demonstrates the potential benefit of early detection and intervention in preventing morbidity and mortality. Hence, it would lessen the length and impact of the disease on a person’s quality of life and also reduce complications and lower the mortality rates of certain diseases because early treatment is often the most effective.
Pages 80-84
Year 2021
Issue 2
Volume 5

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